FREDDY WELLER

 
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FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 22.08.2021 - 18:03 Uhr  ·  #1
Der 60er- und 70er Jahre-Sänger FREDDY WELLER, u.a. bei
PAUL REVERE & THE RAIDERS, wurde am 9. September 1947
in Atlanta, Georgia, geboren. Dennoch war er schon 1959 für
ESCO Records im Tonstudio mit Joe South.

1961 folgte eine Single auf Doré Records, bevor er ab Mitte der
60er Jahre bekannt wurde.
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 22.08.2021 - 18:07 Uhr  ·  #2
Wiederveröffentlichung (Schweden; 1981)
mit dem zweiten Doré-Single-Song aus 1961
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 22.08.2021 - 18:11 Uhr  ·  #3
PRAGUEFRANK-Sessions 1959 und 1961:
Quelle:
http://countrydiscoghraphy2.bl…eller.html



SESSIONS
1959 unknown – Freddy Weller

Tatsächlich im Studio mit Joe South für dessen Label
001 NR-151 GOODBYE Esco 400
002 NR-152 DON’T ANSWER THAT QUASTION Esco 400

1961 unknown – Freddy Weller
003 45-LIB-41 NO ONE TO LOVE Dore 595/Rock and Country 1009
004 45-LIB-42 MARY I'M GLAD TO SEE YOU Dore 595/Rock And Country 1017
ROCK AND COUNTRY 1009 DORE ROCK AND ROLL VOL.1 (SWE, 1981); ROCK AND COUNTRY 1017 (SWE, 1983) DORE ROCK AND ROLL VOL.2
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 22.08.2021 - 18:26 Uhr  ·  #4
...
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 22.08.2021 - 18:34 Uhr  ·  #5
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 24.08.2021 - 12:38 Uhr  ·  #6
Ob Freddy Weller mit zwöf Jahren tatsächlich seine erste Platten-Veröffentlichung hatte wird vielerorts angezweifelt. Die vierzehn Jahre bei der DORÉ-Single könnte man leichter glauben, obwohl auch diese sehr knapp an der Glaubwürdigungsgrenze liegen. Irgendwo wird auch behauptet, dass es seine erste Veröffentlichung überhaupt erst im Jahre 1969 gab und da würde es auch die APT-Single treffen, obwohl diese altersmäßig keine Probleme machen würde. Wie auch immer, in der folgenden Disco sind alle Freddy Weller-Singles zusammengefasst.
Von einem Freddy Weller gab es bis 1975 die folgenden Singles:
ESCO
?? 59....400 FW....FREDDY WELLER..Goodbye (NR-131)/Don’t Answer That Question (NR-132)
DORÉ
?? 61....595....FREDDY WELLER..Mary, I'm Glad To See You (45-LJB-40)/No One To Love (45-LJB-41)
APT
11 65….45-25096….FREDDY WELLER..You Better Go Join The Campfire Girls/Walk Away Softly
COLUMBIA
03 69….4-44800….FREDDY WELLER..Games People Play (ZSP 138648)/Home (ZSP 138649)
06 69….4-44916….FREDDY WELLER..These Are Not My People (ZSP 150879)/You Never Knew Julie (ZSP 150880)
10 69….4-45026….FREDDY WELLER..Amarillo, Texas (ZSP 152055)/Down At The Boondocks (ZSP 152056)
COLUMBIA - HALL OF FAME
12 69....4-33172....FREDDY WELLER..These Are Not My People (ZSP 150879)/Games People Play (ZSP 138648) (44916/44800)
COLUMBIA
01 70….4-45087….FREDDY WELLER..I Shook The Hand (ZSP 152132)/We Gotta All Get Together (ZSP 152133)
04 70….4-45138….FREDDY WELLER..Listen To The Young Folks (ZSS 152195)/That Little Boy (ZSS 152196)
11 70….4-45276….FREDDY WELLER..Goodnight Sandy (ZSS 154341)/The Promised Land (ZSS 152876)
05 71….4-45388….FREDDY WELLER..(I’d Do It All) Over You (ZSS 154243)/Indian Lake (ZSS 154244)
08 71….4-45451….FREDDY WELLER..Another Night Of Love (ZSS 155321)/Always Something Special (ZSS 155322)
01 72….4-45542….FREDDY WELLER..Good Old-Fashioned Music (ZSS 155453)/Ballad Of A Hillbilly Singer (ZSS 155454)
05 72….4-45624….FREDDY WELLER..The Roadmaster (ZSS 156523)/Who Do You Love (ZSS 156524)
10 72….4-45723….FREDDY WELLER..She Loves Me (Right Out Of My Mind) (ZSS 157070)/There’s An Angel On My Shoulder (ZSS 157071)
03 73….4-45827….FREDDY WELLER..Too Much Monkey Business (ZSS 157196)/It Sure Feels Good (To Be Loved Again) (ZSS 157197)
07 73….4-45902….FREDDY WELLER..Betty Ann And Shirley Cole (ZSS 158611)/The Perfect Stranger (ZSS 158612)
11 73….4-45968….FREDDY WELLER..I’ve Just Got To Know (How Loving You Would Be) (ZSS 158715)/Georgia Girl (ZSS 158716)
04 74….4-46040….FREDDY WELLER..Sexy Lady (ZSS 159257)/Bobby Crabtree’s Grave (ZSS 159258)
08 74….3-10016….FREDDY WELLER..You’re Not Getting Older (You’re Getting Better) (ZSS 159376)/Are We Makin’ Love? (ZSS 159377)
COLUMBIA - HALL OF FAME
?? 74....13-33251....FREDDY WELLER..Too Much Monkey Business (ZSS 157196)/She Loves Me (Right Out Of My Mind) (ZSS 157070) (45827/45723)
abc DOT
05 75….DOA-17554….FREDDY WELLER..Show Me The Way To Your Love (45-28783-S)/Love You Back To Georgia (45-28779-S)
09 75….DOA-17577….FREDDY WELLER..Stone Crazy (45-28828-S)/Still Making Love To You (45-28782-S)

Keep Searchin’
Gerd
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 24.08.2021 - 14:26 Uhr  ·  #7
FREDDY WELLER
Everyone advised me, 'Man, this is the greatest thing
that could happen. You've got to quit this Raiders
thing and take advantage of your country career.'
But one thing that they didn't know was that Revere and I
had made a little agreement before I went in to record. That
agreement was that he wanted to let everybody do different
things to add to the power of the group itself, but he said, 'If
for some reason you should have a big hit, 1'd like your word
that you won't leave me. '"
So says Freddy Weller, best known to fans of 1960s pop
as the guitarist who replaced Phil "Fang" Yolk with Paul
Revere and the Raiders and the cowriter of Tommy Roe's
1968 #1 hit, "Dizzy." Yet country music wasn't so much a
stretch for him as it was a spirited return to his roots.
Laughing, Weller says, "I don't know how [country
music] changed my life because I started out with it. The ear,
liest memories I have are in Atlanta, where I grew up.
Atlanta was more of an R&B town, if you really think about
it. There wasn't a country station in the city limits of
Atlanta. So, I would listen to WTJH in East Point, Georgia,
on my little radio. It didn't come in too well. I would listen
to the likes of Hank Williams as he did Luke the Drifter stuff,
Hank Snow, Johnny Cash, and all those type things. It
changed my life from an early age, but it wasn't something
that came along later in my life, because it was always with
me. It was the first thing I ever learned."
As a teenager, Weller parlayed his abilities on the guitar
and bass into a semiregular spot on the Georgia Jubilee, where
he worked alongside fellow up,and,comers Jerry Reed, Ray
Stevens, Billy Joe Royal, and Joe South.
"I kind of got my start with Joe South," explains Weller.
"He probably still is my favorite songwriter. I played in his
band for a while and with whoever was in his band or the
studio group at that time. We did sessions in Atlanta on just
about everything. I don't know if you remember a group
called the Tams? I played on a bunch of their hits and did
some of the background vocals on their things. The first
thing I did that ever landed with any degree of success was
when I played rhythm guitar on 'Down in the Boondocks' by
Billy Joe Royal. Once that record was a hit, I played guitar on
the road with Billy Joe for about a year and a half. He didn't
carry a band. He just carried me, and I showed the band how
to play the songs. So one of the many shows that we played
was the Dick Clark Caravan of Stars, and Paul Revere and the
Raiders were headlining. I'm thinking that was in Canton,
Ohio. We just did our normal thing that we did every night,
and we played everything from little bitty clubs to the big
Caravan of Stars-type shows.
"Unbeknownst to me or anybody else, Paul Revere, for
whatever reason, was needing another guitar player, and he
was privately looking for someone. When he saw me with
Billy Joe, he let a couple of months go by. I never even met
him really because they flashed in and flashed out. I worked
clubs sometimes in Atlanta, and I didn't get home until
around 2:30 in the morning, and I had a note that my
mother had left me: 'Paul Revere of Paul Revere and the
Raiders would like you to give him a call when you come in.'
Well, it was three hours earlier out there, so I went ahead
and called him. He told me he had seen me, and he was won~
dering if I would be interested in talking to him about this
job as a guitar player with the Raiders. I had seen Where the
Action Is, and I knew what they did was rather outlandish
and that was not really me. Especially the dance steps. So, I
told him, no, I didn't think so."

Besides the uniforms and dance steps, Weller had
another reason for turning Revere down: he had begun to
make some progress as a songwriter. "I lay claim to the fact
that I wrote the follow;up that killed the Swinging
Medallions," jokes Weller. "I wrote the follow;up to 'Double
Shot of My Baby's Love' called 'She Drives Me Out of My
Mind.' All this was in Atlanta; I also wrote a lot of country
stuff. I had a Del Reeves album cut and a few things like
that. So, I was very much into the country thing, and there
was starting to be a little groundswell of country music
being recorded in Atlanta. That was one reason for my hes;
itation in taking the job with Revere-I wanted to be part
of the country thing that was happening in Atlanta. But
Revere called again and asked, 'Would you mind just flying
out here and talking to me about it?' The following week;
end I flew out and talked to him about it, and I still turned
it down. A couple of weeks went by, and by now they were
on tour.
"He said, 'If you don't have anything going, just come
out and join us on tour and travel with us for a couple of days
and get a taste of it. Let's see if we can change your mind.'
With that, I did kind of get caught up in what they were
doing, and I realized it was like a Harvard education if you're
going to be in the music business. So I took the job as the
guitar player. They modified the dance steps some, and they
were going through some changes anyway."
The very first time Weller stepped on a stage with Paul
Revere and the Raiders was for an appearance on the Ed
Sullivan Show. He finally got used to the costumes and the
band's zany physical shtick and became a Raider in good
standing and appeared with them on their ABC television
series, Happening '68. However, he still harbored dreams of a
solo career. A combination of efforts from associates both old
and new provided the opportunity.
"Joe South had always been my hero and he had written
songs that I thought were just terrific. When I would go to
Atlanta, I would hear his demos and the things that they
would cut, and it was my biggest treat to listen to the new Joe
South stuff. So when I heard 'Games People Play,' I just went
crazy. I guess I had been with the Raiders about a year and
half. I started with them in '67 and in '69 Joe had cut 'Games
People Play,' and it had come out by him, but it was kind of
hovering around, it wasn't setting the world on fire. So I
learned it and played it on bus tours. I played it so much that
everybody in the band knew it.
"Mark Lindsay, who was the lead singer and producer,
got the idea that we would go in and cut some country things
on me. He kind of did it under the guise of a Raiders session.
We used a couple of outside musicians who were more coun~
try. On my record of 'Games People Play,' there was no lead
guitar. I played rhythm guitar. Keith Allison played bass,
Archie Francis from the Palomino Club played drums, Red
Rhodes from the Palomino Club played steel, and Glenn D.
Hardin played piano. So there was just five pieces on it.
"We recorded two songs and Mark got really excited and
flew to Nashville and talked to Billy Sherrill about signing
me as a country artist. Billy had a couple of suggestions about
the mix, but to make a long story short, they signed me to
Columbia in 1969 as a country artist.

"'Games People Play' went to #2 in Billboard and #1 in
Record Row, which was a pretty prestigious magazine back in
those days. We were touring Europe opening for the Beach
Boys when we found out that 'Games People Play' was doing
so good back home."
Immediately, Weller faced the conflict that defined his
career.
The winner of the ACM's Most Promising Male Vocalist
award in 1969, Weller kept his word to Revere and only pur~
sued country offers when he wasn't working with the
Raiders. At the same time that he was recording such solo
hits as "These Are Not My People," "The Promised Land,"
"Indian Lake," and "Another Night of Love," he was also
appearing on the Raiders hits "Mr. Sun, Mr. Moon," "Let
Me," and the band's only # 1 hit "Indian Reservation."
The temptation to go it alone niggled at him, but Weller
remained gratefuL "Here I am having country hits, some big
ones there at the start, and I couldn't leave the group. And I
wouldn't if I could, because they were so nice to me and they
were so influentiaL I never would've had that opportunity
had I not been with Paul Revere and the Raiders. That
opened the door."
Style~wise, Weller was the perfect cross between down
home country and good 01' rock 'n' rolL "Oh yeah. I tried to
get country rocking years before it really was," he chuckled.
"I was trying to do Travis Tritt when the engineers didn't
know how to turn up the buttons. A lot of them wanted
Eddy Arnold and that was it. So when they would hear it
done louder and harder, to them it wasn't country music. Of
course, then the younger generation came into it; the early
Waylon stuff was starting to happen around that time. The
younger people loved it, and they realized what I was trying
to do even though it took a while to catch up with itself from
the very concept of recording. To turn the bass drum up a lit~
tle bit or put a little more treble on the guitar, the engineers
didn't know how to do it. It was an evolution that took quite
a while."
When asked if the country establishment hassled him
about his rock 'n' roll associations, Weller laughs at his own
recollection. "Well, most were oblivious until I got there,
and then all of these Raiders fans would show up, and they
would notice that they had a whole houseful of people that
they'd never seen before. Back in those days, people who lis~
tened to country didn't know that much about rock, and
vice versa. It was like two totally different things. The only
thing that I really caught a lot of flack from was my hair,
which was too long for most of them. When I would go out
and do my country shows, they would all want to give me a
hair cut. It wasn't six months later until Waylon's hair was
down past his shoulders."
Weller, who won a BMI award for his coauthorship of
the Bob Luman hit "Lonely Women Make Good Lovers,"
stayed with the Raiders until 1973. By then the "new" was
off him and his chart momentum was sharply diminished. As
a solo act, he recorded nine more Top 40 country songs
before he became a full~time songwriter. Creative and pro~
lific, he has crafted material for Reba McIntire, Confederate
Railroad, Vern Gosdin, George Jones, and Pirates of the
Mississippi, among many others.
"It's a whole new ballgame out there, writing and pitch~
ing songs and trying to get them cut. It's a very hard business
but it's very satisfying. But when you do get a song on an
album, it means something these days. The money is a whole
lot better."
Speaking of money, when asked how he feels about
"Dizzy" being used as a Nabisco Double Delight Cookie
jingle, Weller chuckles appreciatively. "I love it. I hope they
use it on every product that comes along."
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Re: FREDDY WELLER

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Gepostet: 24.08.2021 - 14:28 Uhr  ·  #8
das waren ein paar Worte aus dem folgenen Buch:
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